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20th June 2020 – Frampton on Severn

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Not Frampton on Severn again? I’m afraid so. It’s easy access for us, being north of Bristol, and gives us a great opportunity to see rural Britain in all it’s glory with an easy walk and very few people around. It poured with rain on our arrival and so we had our coffee before our walk and then luckily dodged the showers.

DSC00726Swallows on the village green

DSC00829Great crested grebe on the lake

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DSC00896Blue-tailed Damselfly 

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DSC01202 A variety of dragonflies and damselflies – I’m working on their identifications!

DSC00975Greylag goose

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DSC01278Barnacle geese

DSC00935Black-headed gull

DSC01318-2And Ted on someone’s lawn

DSC01259Marsh orchid

Lots of lovely rural scenes:

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And some amazing properties and gardens:

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15th June 2020 – Frampton on Severn

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After a weekend at home we felt the need to venture further afield. But after days of inactivity we couldn’t decide where; so we settled on one of our current favourites, Frampton on Severn.

Although it is 10 miles south of Gloucester it is easy for us, living on the north side of Bristol, to get to.

It’s a really quaint village with a variety of easy walks.

The village web site has this to say about it:

“Frampton on Severn lies about 10 miles south of Gloucester on the eastern side of the River Severn.
According to an entry in the Domesday Book dated 1086 the Manor of Frampton was held by Drew son of Pons, granted to him by William the Conqueror as a reward for his services. The Manor is reputed to be the birth place of “ Fair Rosamund” who was the mistress of Henry II.
The Green is said to be the longest village green in England, and is about 22 acres in size. Cricket is played on The Green outside the Bell Inn, one of the two Pubs on The Green, the other being The Three Horseshoes at the opposite end of The Green.
The area around The Green has been designated a Conservation Area, the range of Architecture spanning several centuries ranges from “ Cruck Cottages” to impressive Tudor and Georgian houses.
The present population of the village is about 1200, this compares with the population record in the Domesday Book of 27. Most of the working population commute to Gloucester, Cheltenham and further afield to Bristol, Swindon and London. However there is a small Industrial Estate within the Village.
The Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin is situated about half a mile from the Southern end of the Green, and can be approached along “ The Narles “ a long avenue of Horse chestnut trees. The Building was first consecrated in 1315 A.D. although some of the Church dates back to the 12th century. The Congregational Church built in 1776 is located just off the centre of The Green and is a very active church.
For Nature and Wildlife lovers Frampton is magnificent, much of the area east of The Green is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and there is an abundance of Flora and Fauna. Due to a policy by the Landowner of farming this area without the use of fertilisers and herbicides the natural habitats have flourished to the benefit of all. The Gloucester – Sharpness Canal with views over the River Severn and the old Gravel workings are linked by a series if public footpaths.
As you will see Frampton on Severn has a very active Community with a Community Centre open 7 days per week as well as many clubs and societies operating within the village.”

We parked on the village green and found the lane which leads to the lake behind Frampton Court. It was a flat and easy walk with occasional good views of the lake.

DSC00776The entrance to Frampton Court from the village green

DSC04319The view of Frampton Court from the lake

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DSC00767The lake tucked behind Frampton Court

On the lake we could see Canada Geese, Greylag Geese and a fair number of Barnacle Geese. There were also Great Crested Grebe (very distant) and even a Common Tern (although my photo was well out of focus).

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DSC04352Greylag Geese

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DSC04343Barnacle Geese

DSC04375Great Crested Grebe

DSC04364Common Tern (I think)

There were damselflies (and other interesting insects) on our walk.

DSC00769The walk through the woods circuiting the lake

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DSC04416Green-veined White

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DSC04445Meadow Brown

A sample of the insects on our walk

At the end of the walk we also spent some time watching the dragonflies on one of the very attractive ponds along the village green.

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DSC04526Pond life on the village green

All it really needed to make this a perfect visit was for the pub to be open!

Nonetheless a dose of nature and some gentle exercise did us the power of good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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9th June 2010 – Stoke Park Estate, Bristol

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It was tempting to hang around Duchess Pond looking for dragonflies but a walk was needed and we made our way to the top of Purdown to extend ourselves.

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It was well worthwhile; the wildflowers were spectacular, particularly the oxeye daisies and we saw a few more birds and butterflies.

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DSC03132Meadow Brown

DSC03247Small Tortoiseshell

DSC03286Marbled White

DSC03269Chaffinch

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And just before the end of our walk a family of whitethroats:

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8th June 2020 – Stoke Park Estate, Bristol

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We missed the best of the weather by going for a walk to Stoke Park in the afternoon. When we arrived the “dragons” did not seem to be awake but then the sun came out and there was life.

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The Canada Goose goslings are still surviving and are so much bigger; certainly much bigger than the wren we saw. Three magpies squabbled

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I took on the challenge of trying to photograph the dragonflies and ignored other birds. Wendy was surprisingly  patient with me.

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DSC02967Emperor dragonfly

We also had a pleasant chat with some other birders and saw some butterflies and moths. IDs will have to wait for another day.

DSC02666Burnet companion moth ?

DSC02679Tyria tiger moth

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DSC02694Meadow brown butterfly

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7th June 2020 – Rodborough Common, Gloucestershire

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Rodborough Common on the edge of The Cotwolds is famous for its wildlife. The National Trust website page has this to say about it:

More than a hundred species of grasses and wildflowers have been recorded, including rare orchids and over 30 species of butterfly, including one of the largest populations of the rare Duke of Burgundy butterfly in the country.”

We weren’t so lucky with butterflies on our morning walk but we enjoyed the spectacular views down towards the Severn Estuary (where we had been a few days before) and loved hearing and seeing an abundance of skylarks.

DSC00242Skylark trying to distract a magpie (and probably us) away from its nesting area

DSC00392Skylark

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DSC00494A welcome coffee before heading home

On our way home we stopped off at Frampton on Severn, wandered around the village green and found a few insects in the village pond.

DSC00539Wishful thinking

DSC00570The Wool Barn

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DSC00597Damselfly

DSC00634Tiger moths

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5th June 2020 – Framilode, Gloucestershire

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Following the advice of a friend we ventured a little further north of Bristol (further north than our last few excursions to Oldbury Power Station on the Severn Estuary) to Framilode. Framilode is a vllage on the River Severn and we walked a section of the Severn Way towards Arlingham Warth.

DSC00448The River Severn at Framilode

As promised we saw very few people and the terrain was very flat. The only handicap was the blustery weather which at least blew the cobwebs away.

DSC00161You might get a sense of the wind from the meadow

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DSC00013A very bucolic scene maybe but perhaps the sheep could have benefited from its coat a few days more?

DSC00122The ancient Forest of Dean on the far bank of the River Severn

We didn’t see much in the way of bird life – just some house martins, a wren with some fledglings, a few shelduck on the River Severn and a couple of black-headed gulls. I also saw my first Small Tortoiseshell butterfly of the year.

DSC00097This poor Small Tortoiseshell could hardly open its wings in the wind

After our walk we drove to Arlingham. We passed the Red Lion on the way to look at the church. There seemed to be a barrel of beer on tap on the forecourt – was this a pilgrim’s way? No, it was simply a barrel of water for dogs.

DSC00480The Red Lion at Arlingham

We can’t wait to go back to do the walk near the Old Passage at Arlingham and visit The  Seafood Restaurant, set at the end of the pennisula on a great ox-bow bend, with some other friends which we have been promising ourselves for some time.

On returning home our friendly robin came to greet us in the garden. He normally stays close to the ground but today the fat balls were too much of a temptation.

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Post script

I wonder if The Seafood Restaurant will be reopening after the lockdown (see photo below with “For Sale” sign)?

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Such wonderful views from Old Passage.

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